The ~Texas~ Mustang Project's Blog

Working for better management options and cohabitation through compromise and communication for the American Wild Mustang

Posts Tagged ‘Cattle’

Re-Posting A Tidbit for Your Thoughts: “Cattle can help with fire risk in Colorado”

Posted by Texas Mustang Project on April 30, 2010

This one just caught my attention right quick… A reposting of some interesting op-ed… On WordPress, there is an app called a “tag surfer”. It basically scans its blogs posted recently that match the tags you attach to your own posts. This one came across this evening, and quite frankly I don’t think it could’ve have come across at a more appropriate time. (Updated with a few comments of my own at the end…)

Community Agriculture Alliance: Cattle can help with fire risk in Colorado

5 hours ago ago by csuile. Spam? Tags: Uncategorized, Beef, Economics, Environment, Colorado, grazing, sustainability, cattle, BLM, USFS, Western Governors Association, Fire

[Source: Op-ed by Brita Horn, Routt County CattleWoman for Steamboat Today]

Cows can be the first line of defense in fighting wildland fires this season. No, do not expect our local cattle to don a yellow Nomex shirt, green brush pants and wildland boots. Do not anticipate seeing bovines eagerly trying to carry a Pulaski tool, a backpack water pump and their fire shelter belted around their waist. However, if we try to work together with the forestry management groups and the local ranchers, we might be able to get some mitigation of reducing flashy fuel loads (grass) growing below our tree lines and reduce the ladder fuels (shrub, brush) carry that fire to the tops of trees and devastate the forest.

Last year was an outstanding year for moisture and minimal wildland fires. It gave yet one more year for the needles to fall off the beetle-kill trees, which will reduce the heat intensity of a fire in most areas. The intensity of the fires is what is different about wildland fires since the past. Fire was always a part of our western heritage. Ignited by lightning and even “prescribed burns” by Native Americans, our western land has seen generations of surface fires that have reduced the dense fuels that are under the tree canopies that were only stopped by a right mix of rain, weather and topography. The natural burning of the lands started to make expected firebreaks and created a variety of landscapes and a habitat for wildlife and livestock to thrive on.

We still have controlled burns in spring and fall and lightning strikes throughout the summer, however, the landscape has changed. Now, we have urban sprawl, subdivisions surrounding public lands and communities nestled in and around tree lines. These communities bring paved highways, power lines, fences and bike trails to the mix. Colorado communities are beginning to identify the areas that have fuel buildup that is surrounding homes, and that creates the urban-interface model.

Now, with the suppression of fires in the forest since they are too close to homes and communities, our forests are not as healthy as in the past. The forests now are filled to capacity: too much vegetation, downed trees, and new seedlings and standing trees. What the frequent natural fires once cleaned out to make open healthy tree stands without disease and insects now are riddled with overcrowding of trees, creating a prescription for higher-intensity fires when Mother Nature strikes. The pine-beetle-killed trees are in various stages of danger: highly intense heated fuel loads with dead and downed trees that will make it nearly impossible to mitigate.

According to the 2002 report, “A Collaborative Approach for Reducing Wildland Fire Risks to Communities and the Environment: 10-Year Compre­­hensive Strategy, Implementation Plan,” by the Western Governor’s Association, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, and others, “The 2000 fire season was one of the worst in 50 years, with nearly 123,000 fires burning 8.4 million acres. More than $2 billion in federal dollars and countless dollars from state and local funds were spent to suppress these wildland fires. The average acreage burned nationally has remained high with 2006 surpassing the devastation of 2000, and fire risk continues to mount. Much of this increased fire risk has resulted from community growth in the wildland-urban interface, build-up of forest and woodland fuel loads from years of fire suppression, and fire-prone ecosystems created by the invasion of exotic plants like cheat grass.”

Since the cheat grass is now on the floor of our forest, it is a perfect time to implement target grazing to reduce these fuels. Target grazing typically tackles four fire fuel types: grass (flashy fuels), shrub, slash and timber.

“Grazing by cattle has been applied to forestlands around the world to reduce fire risk,” (Gold, M.A. and J.W. Hanover. “Agro forestry systems for the temperate zone.” Agroforestry Systems).

The livestock becomes active participants in forestry systems designed to reduce the overcrowding of plants and trees and reduce the likelihood of wildfire. Grazing also can trim ladder fuels and copies the fire pruning effect created by the frequent surface fires that historically burned naturally below the forest canopy. Livestock grazing can clearly adjust the fuel characteristics of forests, though grazing alone does not reduce fire risk. Target grazing allows for the local livestock producers to work with the forest managers to identify the fuel characteristics and develop a strategy to reduce the fuel load and optimize the feed potential.

The strategy would need to include more prescribed burns to fully complement the natural fires of the past that kept the forests healthy. It would take monitoring and flexible procedures to form a successful plan. In order to reduce the fuel loading, integrating grazing and prescribed burns would be the most successful blueprint for our county.

Putting together a line of attack for using grazing livestock as a fire line attack is a complex process. It takes a great deal of cooperation between the forest managers, livestock owners and the public. Using livestock to manage the forest is an ongoing and dynamic process that will take time and persistence to be successful. It will take a great deal of education and training to understand plant and fire characteristics, grazing management and a focus on the goal to reduce fuel loading from all parties. This type of cooperation of all the valued participants could be a cost-effective business model that is a win-win for all involved. For the most part, these relationships already have been forged, and tabletop discussions would be the first step in the right direction for our community. We now have all the tools in the toolbox; now, let’s get to work and hammer out a plan for the future health of our forests.

Well, I went to the websites shown as hyperlinks and I was able to find some of the documentation referenced. However, the links to some of these were “no longer active pages”. So in order to get the rest of the documentation, I had to do a little digging and of course, I found them anyway!

Archive – Wildland Fire Leadership Council News and Accomplishments: A Collaborative Approach for Reducing Wildland Fire Risks to Communities and the Environment, Monitoring and Performance Report DRAFT Briefing Paper (PDF, 1.9 MB) and DRAFT Executive Summary 2007 (PDF, 3.5 MB)

Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS)

Large Fire Suppression Costs: Strategies for Cost Management (PDF 1.2 MB) – A Report to the Wildland Fire Leadership Council from the Strategic Issues Panel on Fire Suppression Costs

Now, maybe I’m wrong, but maybe I’m right… It just seems to me that if there were… I don’t know… say… wild horses and wild bison grazing those lands in the same exact ways that they have been for however many centuries (not in the mood to argue that point right now) Well, it just seems to me that they would be accomplishing the same exact thing that the cattle would be accomplishing… Only differences here lie in the two sides of a coin: heads – the wild horses and wild bison are gathered / hazed and removed from the lands they call home and the cattle come in a replace them at a nice shiny pricetag for most all involved; tails – leave the wild ones there to do what Mother Earth intended them to do in the first place!

But that’s just my “op-ed”…

And this same blog has the audacity to go after the wolves! Wolf-pack report raises doubts, fears March 2, 2010 This is just too much! I’m sorry if you guys think I’m being abrasive or rude, maybe even a little bit of ignorance because I haven’t reserched all of this as much as I normally would… But tough titty said the kitty when the milk ran dry! I’ve just about had enough of all of this. It’s time.

MF*T*

Advertisements

Posted in BLM, Calico Complex Gather 2009-2010, Daily Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments »

“True Grit” Article of Interest Re: Cattle & Their Toll on the Lands…

Posted by Texas Mustang Project on March 7, 2010

I got this link from a friend today… I wasn’t sure what all it entailed at first, but as I read further, I realized that Mr. Marvel (or AB’72) and I would probably get along just fine were we to ever meet. LOL I especially like the “pink pacifier”! T.

True grit

In a heated showdown with Western cattlemen, Idaho environmentalist Jon Marvel, AB’72, tries to outlaw livestock grazing on public lands.

By Lydialyle Gibson
Photography by Dan Dry



It’s Jon Marvel, AB’72, vs. cattlemen in a fight over public lands. View the slide show.

He can’t help looking. Even though Jon Marvel knows there’s probably no bluebunch wheatgrass here, that its numbers in this field have been declining for years, so that a person could walk a mile through the sagebrush—and Marvel has—without seeing a single delicate blond seedhead, he can’t help searching the ground for one. In central Idaho’s dry sage-steppe grasslands, bluebunch wheatgrass is a key native species, year-round forage for elk, deer, and antelope. It’s part of what keeps the ecosystem whole.

“Let’s just take a walk and see,” Marvel says, setting off through the sloping expanse, with sagebrush slapping at his knees and the Lost River Mountains climbing the sky in front of him. He traces a wide circle halfway around Swensen Butte, a high-shouldered mound of dirt and rock on the edge of the Sawtooth National Forest. After half an hour, he’s turned up a few… more

Posted in BLM, Daily Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Check Your Local Listings…

Posted by Texas Mustang Project on February 27, 2010

New Videos from ParelliTube

These are some great TV shows  for information on Cattle Grazing in the US, with highlights on legislation, daily/weekly/monthly/quarterly reports, and a ton of other important Land Use information. Check your local listings for channels & times. (Mine is RFDTV early in the mornings.) T.
“This Week in AgriBusiness”     “Cattleman to Cattleman”     “U.S. Farm Report”

Posted in BLM, Daily Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »