The ~Texas~ Mustang Project's Blog

Working for better management options and cohabitation through compromise and communication for the American Wild Mustang

What this blog is all about…


The purpose of this blog is to provide resources, information, and a forum for individuals to express their opinions, no matter “whose side” they are on. The comment sections on this blog are “open”, that is to say, speak your mind. However, I do ask that you refrain from profanity and the blatant attacking of another individual’s views, and keep it “G” rated. This is a forum for diplomatic, intellectual discussion, not an environment for bashing of another’s beliefs. Any comments made in this manner will be deleted.  

I believe in the rights of the people to have their voices heard. I believe that each individual’s voice has the right to be made known, and to be considered for their value. It is only after all testimony is heard and evidence is presented (that is made available) that one can make a clear and concise decision about the subject at hand.

 I do not believe in the concept of ad hominem. Appealing to one’s emotions and prejudices instead of one’s ability to think intellectually for themselves is a detestable tactic and goes against this country’s very first amendment:

 “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

 Therefore, I make every effort possible to my small human existence to uphold that amendment in all of my writings. As I am human, I will make mistakes, just as all of mankind is prone to making mistakes. If at anytime during my posts, you find that I am guilty of misinformation, typos, or other editorial mistakes I ask that they be brought to my attention immediately so that I may correct them accordingly. But please remember, individual opinions are the right of every person. What is right for one may not be right for another, and vice versa. But that does not make them wrong. I ask that you respect this in the comment sections of this blog.

 That being said, I would like to make sure the air is clear about exactly what my position is on this subject. Check out the page at the top, “Clarification of My Position”. This is the statement I had prepared for the Wild Horse and Burro Program Advisory Board meeting in Reno, NV on December 07, 2009. It’s the best explanation I can think of for this purpose.

 One more thing: When reading the different posts and comments on this blog page, please do so with an open mind. This crazy, mixed-up world of ours is made up of so many individuals with so many different views and thoughts. We owe it to ourselves and to those that we are charged to protect and preserve to collect every possible piece of information, right down to the last drop, no matter how much we agree or disagree, and take those points into consideration.

 Thank you kindly,

  Tracie Lynn Thompson

    AKA *T*

© 2010-2011 Tracie Lynn Thompson. All rights reserved.

7 Responses to “What this blog is all about…”

  1. LOUIE COCROFT said

    TRACIE, COULD YOU GIVE US MORE INFORMATION ON THE McGAVIN PEAK SLATED ROUND-UP? I UNDERSTAND THAT IT IS UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE U.S. FOREST SERVICE, BUT WOULD BE DONE BY BLM CONTRATORS. WHERE DO WE SEND OUR COMMENTS AND BY WHAT DATE? WE CAN’T SEEM TO FIND IT. COULD YOU POST IT ON THE CLOUD FOUNDATION BLOG? WE ARE ALL STANDING READY TO COMMENT. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOU WORK.

    • Louie,
      Just posted some of the info on The Mustang Project’s Blog homepage, waiting on more information to download.
      As for posting on TCF blog, you would have to ask Makendra or Cristine. The Mustang Project is separate from TCF.
      I will get the rest of the info out in just a second… blasted technology LOL, never fast enough when you really want it to be.
      *T*

  2. Lynn Bauer said

    Ms. Thompson –
    I found your website through Matt Dillon’s in the Pryors. I was wondering 1)why I hadn’t ever come across your site before (been reading/researching/studying the subject for nearly 3 years now) and 2)how exactly do you manage to find the time for family, horse training and managing all the information out there about our public lands, the BLM and the many issues coming up almost daily concerning our wild horses? I also was wondering what you hope to be the goal or outcome of this site? What is it that you really want to accomplish (in something less than the size of a dissertation?) I only meant that, most folks, regardless of their level of education and concern aren’t necessarily going to understand most of what you’ve said here and we need lots and lots of regular folks to stop and take an interest, don’t you think?
    Respectfully,
    L. Bauer
    New Mexico

    • Ms. Bauer,
      I’m so glad that you’ve found the site, Welcome! You wouldn’t have come across it before because it was only launched on January 08, 2010.
      Most of the answers to your questions are above in the paragraphs describing what this blog is all about, but I will try to answer the rest as best I can.
      I sometimes don’t find the time actually, which is very frustrating. My family is very supportive of the many interests and projects I am involved with, and some are involved as well. I was just telling a friend this evening how lucky I am for my other half, Clate; he helps with many of the duties involved in these projects to allow more time for other goals and responsibilities to be accomplished. Yes, there is a multitude of information out there and yes, it changes nearly every day, sometimes hourly. I do the best I can with what I have at the time. There are a lot of things that I miss; I am after all only human. Most every day I get started 2 steps behind the game, and I very rarely get ahead. The best I can say is this: I keep the information as organized as possible which makes for easier access when needed and for easier distribution. My Blackberry syncs with MSOutlook (which is the greatest software ever invented!) which helps me with reminder alerts/alarms for various items. I live by this, and by making a list everyday of tasks to be accomplished. Even still, I have many 20 hour days, and some sleepless nights. But I believe it’s worth it. Time is not a luxury that we as advocates are afforded because it is not given to the ones for which we advocate. Currently, I do not have any horses in enrolled in the training program, other than my own of course. The economic status of our region is further into the red than the black. Professional horse training and equestrian arts lessons are “luxury expenses” to most in my region, so most (unfortunately) do not utilize these services. As one could imagine, this frees up a lot of time.
      “What is it that you really want to accomplish?” Beyond what is already stated on this page, I want to give as much educational material as possible for persons involved in the Wild Horse Advocacy communities so that when their voices are heard they can be as effective and efficient as possible. Further information can be viewed on the Clarification of my Position page. Bottom line is this: I want this website and others to assist in accomplishing the goal of having healthy horses running free on healthy rangelands for many years to come without the use of violent, inhuman or cruel methods.
      I understand what you mean about some of the material not being understood by some; I do the best I can to put forth the information in the most “user-friendly” format possible. However, there are some subjects that are more technical, thereby requiring certain terminology that is not as familiar to some as others. In order to accomplish advocating a cause as effectively and efficiently as possible, one must educate him/her self as much as possible.
      Please don’t think me disrespectful by what I am about to say, but I do not subscribe to the labeling of “regular folks” vs. a different label. I consider myself and others around me – including the visitors/contributors of this website – to be the same regarding what “type” of people we are. We all have the same goal in mind: stop animal abuse, neglect, and mismanagement. Recognize them as sentient beings, not “just animals”. I suppose we are “regular folks” because we put our pants on one leg at a time just like everyone else. Most of us don’t consider ourselves to be special or superior. We just want our voices to be heard – loud and clear – in the place of those without voices. For this, I think that the material on this website is beneficial. Any questions regarding any of the information presented are answered as quickly and thoroughly as possible, and any suggestions are taken into consideration and most often accepted.
      Again, welcome! I hope that you enjoy the website and have a positive experience.
      T.

      • Lynn Bauer said

        Ms. Thompson –
        Thanks for replying so promptly! I believe I understand your position and mission and I wish you all the best with this effort! However, you do not know me and therefore cannot know what my use of “regular folks” was intended to convey. That’s OK. I’ve come to find out that people WANT to know and understand what’s going on. In fact, most people I engage in casual conversation with have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA what’s happening with our wild horses! In my experience, I’ve found that most people, regardless of education or experience, do appreciate getting the information (real facts, not just emotion) as quickly and simply as possible. The easier we make it for all people to get the “message,” the more they’ll do in response. By “regular folks” I meant those not necessarily “in the wild horse loop,” the blogosphere, the techie world, Rss feeds, etc. There are so many websites and blogs, everything out there is so fragmented, it’s very difficult to tell “regular folks” where to go to find the facts. We need them, too, don’t we, although I agree we all “put our pants on one leg at a time!”
        Best of luck,
        LB

  3. chloe said

    Hi this is fantastic, i work with wildhorses in New Zealand. some of this imformation is very relevant to what we are dealing with in relation to our own wild horse herds.

    Please check out my wild horse blog http://www.wildhorseproject.blogspot.com

    I am currently training a wild stallion and mare, to show that although wild they are just as able as a capable as domestic horses. i hope to promote the breed, raise public awareness regarding wild horses, and show people that any horse can be taught to do anything with good horsemanship and patience.

  4. […] What this blog is all about… […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: