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Working for better management options and cohabitation through compromise and communication for the American Wild Mustang

BLM Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather

Posted by Texas Mustang Project on October 3, 2011


BLM Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather

Ely, Nev. – The Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Battle Mountain District, Tonopah Field Office and BLM Ely District, Egan Field Office are soliciting public comment on the Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA), which analyzes several management alternatives including the Proposed Action which is a pilot management alternative.  The newly proposed method calls for a phased-in approach to reach the appropriate management level over a six to 10 year period by reducing removals, implementing fertility control, adjusting sex ratios and  managing a non-breeding population of geldings.  The BLM will accept comments until Friday, Oct. 28, 2011.

The proposed gather area is located in south-central Nevada approximately 30 miles west of Ely and 80 miles northeast of Tonopah, Nev.  The proposed gather is tentatively scheduled to begin in January 2012. The proposed gather is needed to remove excess wild horses to help prevent further deterioration of the range, reduce population growth rates, achieve and maintain a thriving natural ecological balance and maintain healthy wild horse populations.   

The Pancake Complex consists of the Sand Springs West and Pancake Herd Management Areas (HMAs), Jakes Wash Herd Area (HA) and Monte Cristo Wild Horse Territory (WHT).  The BLM Battle Mountain District, Tonopah Field Office administers the Sand Springs West HMA.  The BLM Ely District Office administers the Pancake HMA and Jakes Wash HA.  The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Ely Ranger District administers the Monte Cristo WHT.

Written comments may be submitted to the BLM Ely District Office, HC 33 Box 33500, Ely, NV 89301, attn: Gary W. Medlyn, Egan Field Manager, or by email to PancakeComplex@blm.gov.  Email comments sent to any other email address will not be considered.

The Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather Preliminary Environmental Assessment is available online at http://www.blm.gov/nv/.  Click on the Ely District map and then click on the EA listed “In the Spotlight.”  Printed copies are available at the BLM Tonopah Field Office, 1553 South Main Street, in Tonopah; and the BLM Ely District Office, 702 North Industrial Way, in Ely.

-BLM-

 

Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather: Progress as of Sep 28, 2011

 

Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather

 

 

Goal of Gather:

 

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Battle Mountain District, Tonopah Field Office and BLM Ely District, Egan Field Office are soliciting public comment on the Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA).  The BLM will accept comments until Friday, Oct. 28, 2011.

 

The BLM is proposing to gather and remove excess wild horses from in and outside the Pancake and Sand Springs West Wild Horse Herd Management Areas (HMAs), and the Jakes Wash Wild Horse Herd Area (HA) (Pancake Complex).  The gather and removal of excess wild horses from the U.S. Forest Service’s (USFS) Monte Cristo Wild Horse Territory (WHT) is also included in the proposed action and is covered by an existing USFS decision document.  The Monte Cristo WHT is managed in accordance with an Interagency Agreement between the BLM and the USFS and is included for informational purposes and cumulative impact analysis.  The proposed gather area is located in south-central Nevada approximately 30 miles west of Ely and 80 miles northeast of Tonopah Nev.

 

The proposed gather is needed to remove excess wild horses to help prevent further deterioration of the range, reduce population growth rates, achieve and maintain a thriving natural ecological balance and maintain healthy wild horse populations.  At the time of the proposed gather, it is estimated that the population will be more than 1,653 wild horses in the Pancake HMA where the AML is 240-493 wild horses; 153 wild horses in the Sand Springs West HMA where the AML is 49 wild horses; 132 wild horses in the Jakes Wash HA which is managed for 0 wild horses; and 270 wild horses in the Monte Cristo WHT where the AML is 72-96 wild horses. The estimate includes the 2011 foal crop. Wild horse numbers fluctuate between the HMAs and WHT, based on seasonal movement. 

 

The EA analyzes several management alternatives including the Proposed Action which is a pilot management alternative.  The newly proposed method calls for a phased-in approach to reach the appropriate management level over a six to 10 year period by reducing removals, implementing fertility control, adjusting sex ratios and managing a non-breeding population of geldings. 

 

The Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather Preliminary Environmental Assessment is available on this website.  Printed copies are available at the BLM Tonopah Field Office, 1553 South Main Street, in Tonopah; and the BLM Ely District Office, 702 North Industrial Way, in Ely.
Written comments may be submitted to the BLM Ely District Office, HC 33 Box 33500, Ely, NV 89301, attn: Gary W. Medlyn, Egan Field Manager, or by email to PancakeComplex@blm.gov.  Email comments sent to any other email address will not be considered.

 

Adoption:

 

Wild horses removed from the HMAs and WHT will be made available for adoption. Animals for which there is no adoption demand will be placed in long-term pastures where they will be humanely cared for and retain their “wild” status and protection under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The BLM does not sell or send any horses to slaughter.

 

Background:

The BLM Ely District, Egan Field Office administers the Pancake HMA and Jakes Wash HA. The BLM Battle Mountain District, Tonopah Field Office administers the Sand Springs West HMA. The Monte Cristo WHT is managed in accordance with an Interagency Agreement between the BLM and United States Forest Service.
For more information on the Wild Horse and Burro Program, call 866-468-7826 or email wildhorse@blm.gov.
 

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7 Responses to “BLM Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Pancake Complex Wild Horse Gather”

  1. Linda Horn said

    If they want geldings on the range, the can revisit the HMAs that have been zeroed out, but are fine for livestock, or the HAs they’ve chosen not to manage for Mustangs, but have the ability to convert to HMAs, or create a perserve, or allow someone else to use BLM land to create a preserve, or …, or …, or …! What if this latest “experiment” backfires, and results in suffering from injuries out where there’s nobody to put the horses down? Mustangs die on the range as it is, but, IMO, this tempts fate!

    • You are absolutely correct Linda. There are so very many complications that can arise in the best of settings during and after a gelding procedure. This just goes above and beyond rational decision making.
      T.

  2. Linda Horn said

    T., I tried the “Subscribe” direct link twice, and it didn’t work either time. Why does WordPress keep messing with what was a good thing? Are they trying to keep up with the latest Facebook disasters?

  3. Anonymous said

    what’s the point of putting geldings on the range – they will have no instincts to protect the mares – blm took all that away when they gelded them – dont they realize that when you geld a horse – you take away the horse’s desire ever to be a protector or a leader – they are just like mares – they will need a leader

    i am so sick of the blm wild horse policy – just goes to prove they KNOW ABSOLUTELY NOTHING of how a wild herd of horses function – there is a band stallion – not a gelding in charge, he protects the mares and young from other stallions and also wild life – there is an older mare that leads the herd to grass and water – they follow her but its the stallion that protects – geldings would not have any desire to lead or protect

    • While I do not agree with the BLM’s policy of returning geldings to the wild, there are a few misconceptions in your comment.
      1) Geldings are not just like mares. They are in fact very protective – both in the wild and domestically – of those other members of their herd.
      2) Gelding a horse does not take away his desire to ever be a protector or a leader.
      3) The stallion does protect the mares and colts from danger, but he is not actually the “leader”. The Lead Mare – sometimes she is older and sometimes she is not – is essentially the “co-leader” of the harem. She also protects the harem from danger, but as well she teaches every member of that harem how to be a horse. Without her beneficial teachings and lessons, the outcome for a young member of the harem is very grim. This is what is known as the language of Equus.
      Every horse – whether a mare, stallion, or a gelding – has a desire to be the leader on some level. Who actually becomes the leader is determined by the strongest horse in what we call the “pecking order”. This is observed in the wild and domesticated horses when observing their very intricate herd dynamics. (There have been geldings in the wild who have led their own harems. Not many and not for very long of course, but they had spent their lives as stallions and simply didn’t know the difference in their own minds regardless of the absence of sufficient reproductive hormones.)
      T.

  4. Anonymous said

    Please STOP.

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