The ~Texas~ Mustang Project's Blog

Working for better management options and cohabitation through compromise and communication for the American Wild Mustang

Updated UPDATE: 172 Gathered & SAVED Horses in Nevada, July 10 & 11, 2010

Posted by Texas Mustang Project on July 11, 2010


Updated Update from Willis: (July 11)

The link below provides a more detailed account of the “rescue” of the Pilot Valley horses at the Fallon Livestock Exchange.  Apparently this was a record breaker at Fallon.
It was getting late and most of us were pretty busy hauling horses so I don’t have the best photos to post to the story yet. (If anyone has better photos to contribute, please email them to me.)
This was clearly an exemplary team effort among those groups that can step up and get things done when needed.
Here’s the report on auction day.
http://www.aowha.org/activities/pilot_valley_rescue02.html
This report will continue as the investigation into where these horses actually came from progresses. In the meanwhile the strategy is to let the horses rest for a while, undisturbed.
As an additional note, the mare with two healthy twins was most unusual. This is only the second time I’ve actually seen such a thing, the other being a domestic draft cross. Cowboy Poet Harold Roy Miller and his wife, Diana, ended up hauling the twins. Harold, an avid horse enthusiast, was walking about a foot off the ground afterwards. Considering that Harold is quite a bit over 6 feet tall to begin with, I’m sure he was bumping his head on the clouds.
By the end of the day everyone was mighty tired, but it was a good kind of tired.

“:O) Willis

 

Update from Willis: (July 10)

End of a long day.  We moved 167 horses in a little over 3 1/2 hours.

Here’s the tally:

There were originally 174 horses that were supposed to have been picked up.  It turned out that there appears there were only 173.    One got injured and was euthanized.  That left 172.

Out of the 172, here’s the final score-  Lifesavers 167, Kill Buyers 0, personal buyers 5.  (Lifesavers didn’t keep some experienced horsepersons from acquiring personal horses.)

I have to tell you that most of them don’t look like ranch stock horses.  Some look more like Utah Sulphurs.  There are a handful that do look like quarter horses and we were told that a few came off the Winecup ranch.  Those could very well be offspring from domestic stock that got loose.  I’m still not convinced that the others are private “estrays.”

Here’s what the horses generally looked like – in this case the mares after unloading.  They kind of have that lean, mustang look to them.

And here is the mare with her twins.  You could probably pass them off as Sulphurs. 

I’ll post more later but I’ll say right now that Jill Starr and the allies that she brought together did a freakin’ amazing job today.

“:O) Willis

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7 Responses to “Updated UPDATE: 172 Gathered & SAVED Horses in Nevada, July 10 & 11, 2010”

  1. Thank you all for what you have been able to do. I hope there will be success in proving where these wild ones came from. It would be a wonder to get them home. That never seems to happen anymore. Keep them save. mar

  2. Linda said

    This is such good news. Thanks so much to everyone involved. Getting all this organized and making it happen – wonderful stuff and will make for pleasant dreams, at least for one night.

  3. sandra longley said

    You all are miracle workers!

  4. sandra longley said

    If I had to choose…I’d rather be called a handwringer…than a liar cheat and thief…I consider myself to be a handwringer looking for a kneck

  5. Linda said

    BEAUTIFUL TWINS! Odds – 1 in 10,000 births. They sure look healthy, although mom seems a bit thin – probably from all that nursing. But she looks strong and will undoubtedly pick up weight once the babies are weaned. I sure hope wherever they go we’ll continue to get updates on this special family.

  6. Cindi said

    This is absolutely phenominal!!

  7. donna said

    WOW!!! WAY TO GO JILL!!!!

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