The ~Texas~ Mustang Project's Blog

Working for better management options and cohabitation through compromise and communication for the American Wild Mustang

Re-Posting Message from Willis Lamm, April 18, 2010

Posted by Texas Mustang Project on April 18, 2010


Good morning.  

First, some points of clarification for folks following the Calico issue.   

The BLM posted on their daily update log that gelding has started on studs aged 4 and younger. 

http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/fo/wfo/blm_programs/wild_horses_and_burros/calico_mountains_complex/gather_activity_updates.html 

Some advocates expressed concerns that this activity might be in conflict with IDA’s court challenge since Judge Friedman is not expected to rule until late May. 

The primary issue presently under the court’s consideration involves horses that would be turned over to long term holding.  Horses aged 4 and under are headed for the adoption program and therefore don’t fall under the scope of these particular court arguments. 

With respect to adoptions, our adoption corrals were next to BLM’s adoption corrals at the Nevada Humane Society’s “Super Adoption” yesterday in Reno so I got a chance to chat with JD from Palomino Valley Center.  Since rumors still continue to circulate I verified some things with JD and some of the BLM volunteers. 

No BLM horses remain at the Snow feed lot.  None of the Snow horses went to Indian Lakes or vice versa.  Most of the Snow horses have been or are going to the Mustang Heritage Foundation.  The rumors surrounding BLM horses and Snow’s are just that. 

Veterinarians Rich Sanford and Gerald Peck are licensed in Nevada.  There has been a great deal of confusion regarding facility vets (who are licensed) and APHIS and Nevada Department of Agriculture vets who according to present regulations don’t have to be licensed.  Docs Sanford and Peck are extremely competent and Doc Peck is who we call on to handle our most difficult cases at LRTC’s rehab corrals. 

None of the Indian Lakes horses are going to any of the public adoptions (e.g., internet adoption) until the pigeon fever and any other health issues have been resolved.  There are some rare exceptions, such as needy foals and/or other special needs horses that the nonprofit horse groups may occasionally take in for specialized care.  BLM has a huge number of healthy animals to place and they are not going to offer unfit horses to the public. 

Speaking of needy foals, LRTC’s Calico orphan went to the super adoption and was quite well behaved.  Kelly Lyons had worked with her for about three weeks and the little filly did quite well in halter.  We have a prospective adopter for her who we are going to check out.  (As a BLM horse this foal will have to meet BLM’s adoption criteria and enter into a BLM maintenance and care agreement.) 

The super adoption event coordinator informed me of a bit of skullduggery that took place prior to the super adoption.  It seems that a representative of another Nevada horse group whom I won’t name went to Nevada Humane and basically claimed that BLM was going to bring over diseased horses and was going to spread pigeon fever among the animals at the event.  According to the super adoption representative, this person’s group would step in and take over BLM’s spot at the event.  LRTC’s and Let ‘Em Run’s horses were the only other equines at the event and our position was that this claim was pure BS and we were quite comfortable having our horses next to BLM’s. 

While a lot of us may not be happy with BLM’s administrative range policies and some of the ground activities at Calico, the horses that BLM presents at these kinds of events are usually ones that have had some kind of special needs (rejected foals, orphans, etc.) and in which volunteer advocates have spent hours socializing and training.  I’m as loud of a critic as anyone with respect to BLM’s range policies, but we all need to support the parts of their program that are positive and especially the tangible work to help horses that has been accomplished by all of the volunteers.  These territorial games need to stop. 

Apparently this same group asked BLM to prep a large number of burros that the group had assured BLM they could place.  BLM arranged to provide the burros and the group never followed through.  So it appears that BLM has a whole passle of really nice burros that perhaps some of the other groups could help find homes for. 

An issue that is completely separate from what goes on out on our public lands is that there is great value in helping find the best possible homes for those horses and burros that are clearly not going back onto the range.  Every horse matched with a qualified, caring adopter is a horse that is out of harm’s way. 

LRTC booth and corrals at the super adoption

 

Three horses were presented by LRTC. 

  1. “Calico Kid” or “Calico Callie,” BLM orphan foal trained by Kelly Lyons
  2. “Black Coffee,” Virginia Range fertility study colt trained by Bonnie Repogle (“BC” is a Let ‘Em Run horse.)
  3. “Cinnamon,” a 4 year old Virginia Range fertility study mare, LRTC, trained by me.

The two Virginia Range horses were headed to slaughter dealer Ole Olsen until they were “redirected” to the non profits by Mike Holmes. 

Kelly Lyons explaining training approaches to visitors

 

BLM horses presented by volunteer trainer Sylvia Beck and crew

BLM burros

The other day in prep for a media presentation I was asked what the difference was between “wild horse advocates” and “wild horse activists.”  I figured the answer was pretty simple.  Unlike the conventional use of the term, an “activist” is someone who actually engages in finding solutions.  While we should always advocate for free roaming horses and burros, we have to stay active and solve problems, even if it is one horse at a time. 

“:O) Willis 

Advertisements

36 Responses to “Re-Posting Message from Willis Lamm, April 18, 2010”

  1. jan said

    i sure hope that tomahawk and the other stallion lightning will not be gelded sure there are adopters out there that would like these stallions – or perhaps they might be turned loose – that is prayer for these horses that they will be returned to freedom

    • Jan Eaker said

      They are gelding 4 years and younger, I believe tomahawk, Lightening and General are all older than that. read Laura Leigh’s blog, she has had extensive sonversations with BLm out there as regards the older horses.

  2. Willis, Thanks, good to hear from you and I do hope the burros get a chance to find homes. Can you tell us how many are there and adoptable? I have heard good things about having burros with horses in pasture, mainly that they raise an alarm well if something is amiss and if coyotes or other predators come around. Is this true? mar

    • Alarm? I think that’s a bit of an understatement LOL… Yes, putting burros with any livestock is almost a necessity if you have a predator problem. Here, we have very large packs of coyotes, (very large and very loud!). We’ve actually hired a trapper every year for the past ten years to come in and remove as many as he can from our acres. Still, they are smart little buggers and keep their numbers pretty strong. My mare India was attacked 3 years ago. She had multiple large lacerations to her face and neck, along with several smaller lacerations to her limbs and rump. To me, this says they were going to a direct kill, not just a “take her down” approach. I don’t know how, but she fought them off – even taking one out with a swift kick to the head. We rushed her to the vet hospital and got her stitched up. A few months of rehab and close care and she doesn’t even show scars (thanks to Happy Jack and Cut-N-Heal). However, she hates dogs – naturally so. Three adult burros and now one yearling burro (we didn’t know the little mare was bred) have been her pasture mates ever since. And ever since, the coyotes won’t come near the the interior of the pasture. India feels safer when they are around and doesn’t even mind the little one playing with her. I feel safer knowing that they’re there – just in case.
      Interesting fact: A burro who is “attached” to a horse or herd of horses in a pasture will defend that horse or herd from a predator. If you’ve ever felt the bite or kick of a burro, you know – this is not an animal that you want to piss off.
      T.

      • Well said, T, I was hoping for a strong burro endorsement and you gave 100%. mar

        • Hey, they may be some of the loudest and most annoying of the equine family sometimes, but I’ll thank them ’til the day I’m gone for all the safety they provide to my India. And yea, they’re kind of cute sometimes too… ‘Specially when they get to playing! It’s hilarious!
          T.

    • Burros are great “watch animals.” They also make really effective alarm clocks.

      To set a burro alarm clock, simply feed the burro at the same time every morning. You won’t likely oversleep.

      Regarding availability I’m forwarding a message from Tim Green at PVC.

      Side note to Cindy… Might be a good item to add to this week’s newsletter.

      Willis,

      Right now we have 23 jack burros and 17 jenny burros. Problem is that we
      are having fewer jenny’s available but the overall count is increasing (the
      jennys are foaling).

      The people that are interested in the burros should contact either JD or
      myself.

      Timothy Green
      Contact Representative/Adoption Clerk
      National Wild Horse and Burro Center
      Palomino Valley
      office (775)475-2222
      fax (775)475-2053
      Timothy_Green@blm.gov

      • Thanks so much for the information and the burro stories. The photos and the ‘Burros Kick Butt’ was cool. Coyotes do not like anything to walk straight up to them. Approached by unafraid guard burros. Good one, Willis… mar

  3. I LOVE burros! But, I can’t take one at this time. Ami is 20, and Indy is only 12. I was thinking that if anything happened to Ami, I would love to get Indy a burro as a pasture mate. It would be fine with Indy – he LOVES everything and everybody. LOL!

    Of course, Ami is part pony, so she will probably outlive ME. ;o)

  4. SHIRLEY LE GARDE said

    You mentioned something I do not understand. Why were the two Virgina Rangehorses going to that disgustable Ole Olsen. I thought the BLM was not allowed to sell to KILLERS.

    • “The two Virginia Range horses were headed to slaughter dealer Ole Olsen until they were “redirected” to the non profits by Mike Holmes.

    • What makes this wild horse puzzle difficult to bring into focus is that different herds legally fall under the authority of different agencies. Only the BLM and US Forest Service are bound under the conditions of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The other agencies fall within the scope of other laws that offer varying degrees of protection. Most of the mustangs that end up at the slaughter houses come from these other agencies – which is why we need a real national horse policy.

      The Virginia Range herd, some 1500 horses, falls under the authority of the Nevada Department of Agriculture. BLM pulled out of the area decades ago (due to urban / suburban development) and sold off the HMA properties to developers. While many of the horses still range on public lands, these lands aren’t inventoried horse areas so if the horses hadn’t been redesignated as state property, they would have been rounded up.

      The State of Nevada also has laws protecting wild horses but the Gibbons Administration hasn’t been real keen on following the law. Gibbons showed former Agriculture Director Don Henderson the door and installed his buddy and anti government crusader Tony Lesperance as Director of Agriculture. It’s not legal to slip state property out the door to kill buyers and EWA is trying to get charges filed against Lesperance for the 8 horses that did end up going to Olsen … not only through an illegal sale but with state employees with a state truck and trailer hauling the horses across the state to Lesperance’s buddy Olsen.

      Rather than plug up this blog with all the sordid details, there is a Wild Horse War Room story on this incident that can be read here:

      http://www.aowha.org/war/ndaslaughter0901.html

      Plus this isn’t the only case we have going against the Department. They have discovered that citizens and employees have been carrying pocket voice recorders and we’ve caught them doing a few nefarious things.

      “:O) Willis

      • sandra longley said

        Willis, what can we do to help? It is difficult I know to apply pressure to state politics when you don’t reside there..I have been commenting on articles in the paper in Nevada to give locals support.

        • Sandra,

          Comments in the blogs associated with news articles help in several ways. The papers use reader responses to gauge interest in various subjects. Blog responses show other readers what kind of support the horses have. Really good arguments posted in blogs tend to become part of the greater dialogue. Sometimes folks either come up with brilliant ideas or the blog discussions generate a train of thought that produces some good ideas.

          BTW, the County has been going around to the different communities assessing community concerns (growth, noise, pollution, congestion, jobs, etc.) and among the top five issues that Stagecoach residents wanted included in county planning was to preserve open space for our wild horses.

          Here’s a link worth checking out.

          http://www.8newsnow.com/Global/category.asp?C=63593

          The most current story is I-Team: Nearly 80 Wild Horses Dead After Roundup.

  5. LOUIE COCROFT said

    BURROS–I HAVE A STORY. WE HAD OUR NEIGHBOR’S PACK BURROS NEXT TO US FOR A FEW YEARS. THEY WERE SORT OF FAMILY PETS, AS WELL. ONE DAY WE HEARD A LITTLE BOY SCREAMING. WE WENT OUT TO THE FIELD WHERE THE BURROS WERE. THE LITTLE BOY HAD PUT HIS HAND IN THE JENNY’S MOUTH. SHE PRESSED JUST HARD ENOUGH TO KEEP HIM FROM REMOVING HIS HAND, BUT THAT WAS ALL. WHEN WE LOOKED AT HIS HAND, THERE WASN’T EVEN A MARK.

  6. Burros have always sort of reminded me of the “Ugly Duckling” story… For most, they’re not that great to look at on first site. They are indeed loud and annoying. They even have an odd smell about them if you’re not used to it. But once you get to know them, you find that behind all of those things that you originally thought were bad there is an incredibly smart, intelligent, and even charming little equine.
    T.

  7. Jan Eaker said

    Willis, good report, tracie , thanks for posting this, I believe Virginia Range horses do not fall under BLM jusrisdiction, Mar, Tracie, am I right on this? therefore they could be sold to a slaughter buyer,

    • Hey Jan,

      Sorry it’s taken me so long… I am going to research a little deeper into this situation. It was a previous research project that got side-railed due to the other pressing issues. However, with the “Jet” incident and now with this situation, I have a feeling that this needs more light. Can’t promise when it’ll get done, but I’ll do my best.

      T.

  8. From National Park Service to US Fish and Wildlife, private and State, wild horses can be and are hauled directly to sales, then go to slaughter. mar

  9. jan said

    burros – i have the book by marguriete henry – brighty of the grand canyon

  10. carson said

    You all might be interested in this photo essay, where my pair of adopted BLM burros run off a pack of coyotes.

    http://www.the7msnranch.com/2009/03/herd-meets-packand-kicks-butt.html

    I will advocate for the adoption of BLM burros until I take my last breath – they are the most underrated, charming, entertaining, loyal, adorable creatures to walk this earth.

    • sandra longley said

      I went to your website and really enjoyed the pictures! I do worry about the burros being adopted, and they not get into the hands of ropers who seem to like to use them for heading and healing practice-I have also seen large breeding operations tie their foals to burrors for halter breaking puposes..too lazy and time consuming to do the work themselves..I don’t think burrors get the respect they deserve.

      • tracielynnthompson@yahoo.com said

        I think that burros need 2 get just as much attention as we give 2 the horses. I’ve been reading the comments and replies & I’ve realized just how much we’ve *not* focused on them. Louie & I talked about this awhile back & just as we were getting ready 2 get the ball rolling there was yet another upset with the horses. We need 2 get info & we need 2 make sure that we take the appropriate actions in their sted. Burros are an *excellent* mate for orphaned foals, specifically a jenny. If she also has a foal, certain actions can be taken (in some cases, not a guaranteed every time) to have her accept the horse foal as her own foal’s twin, and therefore allow him to nurse. The greatest benefit of this is one that Sandra mentioned. As a trainer, my absolute MOST difficult cases are the ones who were spoiled as foals/colts. These are horses, not people. The cute little behaviors are cute when their 200lbs or so. They are NOT cute at all when that colt is a strapping 1100lbs!!! They are very dangerous! If I could tell every foal/colt owner one piece of advice, it would be this: DO NOT, under any circumstances, allow that foal/colt to act in a manner that his dam would not allow. Trust me when I say, you WILL regret it one day – either in the form of you or a loved one getting hurt, or in the form of that foal/colt having 2 deal with the mental stress of being disciplined for a behavior that you have always said was ok and reinforced by participating. A jenny will not allow these things. Furthermore, their personalities can actually solidify the mental states of these young horses following a loss of his dam. Ok… Off my soap box… For now… LOL T.

        • Tracie, I am glad you said this as I intended to write again about it. In my opinion it would be good to post the burro roundups as we get dates. Just like a horse roundup. If we are lucky enough to get a comment period then there can be some good researching.. even if not, comments can still be made. mar

    • Carson,
      Glad to see you here at TMP!
      Thanks so much for the photos, they’re awesome!
      T.

  11. sandra longley said

    Burros are also great as companions for orphan foals..It is humane nature to spoil an orphan, no one wants to disipline them for bad behavior like a mare would, so many grow up with no respect for humans and difficult to train..the burro gives them the kind of companionship they need and is the right size, but will not tolerate nonsense, and they are pretty stoic, and can teach them skills that humans can’t, don’t or won’t.

  12. LOUIE COCROFT said

    I ALSO WORRY ABOUT THE BURROS BEING ADOPTED. ONE WEBSITE SAID THAT THE MILITARY USES THEM FOR CARRYING BOMBS INTO AREAS THAT THEY WANT “DISPATCHED”. AT THIS POINT, I DON’T DISMISS ANYTHING THAT I READ OR HEAR.

  13. LOUIE COCROFT said

    THERE IS A BILL PENDING IN MISSOURI THAT NEEDS TO GO DOWN:

    Jan 24, 2010 by lauraallen Horse Slaughter
    Update April 11: H.B. 1747, a bill to promote horse slaughter has been assigned to the Missouri Senate Agriculture, Food Production and Outdoor Resources Committee.

    Though it has not been announced, the committee is expected to take up the bill on April 21, 2010. Please find members here (just click on their names for contact info) and write (faxes are best) or call and urge committee members to vote no to H.B. 1747. Don’t wait. Do it now. This bill has already passed the state House of Representatives.

    In particular, contact these state senators to voice polite opposition to H.B. 1747: Sen. Jolie Justus (573-751-2788); Chair of the Agriculture, Food Production, etc. Committee Sen. Dan Clemens (573-751-4008); Senate Floor Leader Sen. Kevin Engler (573-751-3455) and the Senate Pro Tem, Sen. Charlie Shields (573-751-9576).

  14. LOUIE COCROFT said

    I SENT PRIORITY MAIL LETTERS TO KEY SENATORS.

  15. LOUIE COCROFT said

    THANK YOU TO WILLIS FOR THE LINK AND INFO–ALWAYS WONDERED WHETHER THOSE ONLINE DEBATES DO ANY GOOD. THEY GET PRETTY GOOD AND THE WILD HORSE AND BURRO ADVOCATES MAKE A GOOD SHOWING. IT IS A PLACE TO START IN ORDER TO GET THE TRUTH OUT THERE.

  16. LOUIE COCROFT said

    TRACIE, RIGHT ON. HORSES ARE JUST LIKE CHILDREN–THEY NEED TO LEARN RULES OF BEHAVIOR AND GOOD MANNERS.
    SOMETHING ELSE ON THE BURROS
    REGARDLESS OF FAITH OR RELIGIOUS PERSUASION, IT HAS ALWAYS SEEMED SIGNIFICANT TO ME THAT IT WAS THE BURRO THAT CARRIED MARY WHEN SHE WAS TOO TIRED TO WALK, AND THE BURRO THAT CARRIED JESUS INTO JERUSALEM. FOR THOSE THAT FOLLOW JESUS’S TEACHINGS, THAT SHOULD BE SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT.

    • Same here, Louie. I’ve always known the burros and “donkeys” with the dorsal stripe and crossed wither stripe as a “Bible Stripe Donkey”. (Donkey is the name they are called by in my area, even if they’re not really LOL)
      My Grandmother told me the story of these little equids when I was young. She said that if the burro or “donkey” had this “cross” on his back, he was a descendent of the very same donkeys that had carried Mary to the stable, gazed upon the newborn face of Jesus, and carried Jesus into Jerusalem. She said they were to be revered as special among their kind, and were to be respected for their heritage. Of course, I believed her then, and I really can’t say that I don’t still believe her story now. (Hey, it could happen! 😉 )
      My Grandmother was a wonderful woman who believed as most Cherokee do – animals are to be respected and their spirits are to be thanked should they serve the purposes of man with their lives. To not thank them was a grevous disrespect (and still is, no matter whether they believe it or not!) Any Cherokee who committed this disrespect was not looked upon favorably by the other members of the families and tribes. They were actually shunned by members of our family and tribe.
      The point is this: Whether you believe the stories or in Jesus or not, these animals are still sentient beings with feelings and emotions. No, they are not the exact same feelings and emotions as humans, but that doesn’t make them any less important! To believe otherwise is simply another form of prejudice.
      T.

  17. LOUIE COCROFT said

    SOMETHING ELSE THAT I READ ABOUT BURROS. THEY CAN DIG DOWN AS FAR AS 4 FEET FOR WATER, THUS ALLOWING OTHER ANIMALS TO DRINK.

  18. LOUIE COCROFT said

    CARSON, THANK YOU FOR THE WONDERFUL PICTURES OF YOUR RANCH. I AM GOING TO SHARE THIS WITH FRIENDS.

  19. LOUIE COCROFT said

    WILLIS POSTED A LINK TO GEORGE KNAPP’S ARTICLE. WE SHOULD ALL GO IN AND COMMENT TO BACK GEORGE UP. HE CAN ONLY GO AS FAR AS THE NEWSTATION AND NEWPAPER WILL LET HIM. HE WANTS TO TO MORE, BUT THERE HAS TO BE INTEREST SHOWN. LET’S GIVE THEM A GOOD SHOWING.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: