The ~Texas~ Mustang Project's Blog

Working for better management options and cohabitation through compromise and communication for the American Wild Mustang

Broken Arrow / Calico Updates – April 13-15, 2010

Posted by Texas Mustang Project on April 16, 2010


Thursday, April 15 Most stallions and weaned colts are doing well and gaining weight.  Mares from Black Rock East, Black Rock West and most Granite horses continue to do well.  Mares from Warm Springs and Calico are improving.  Mares which have been isolated for poor condition are gaining weight as well.  No miscarriages occurred.  The mares are actively foaling and new foals are born daily. Some visitors to the Indian Lakes Road Facility in Fallon have noticed some hematomas that look very similar to pigeon fever, which had been identified in a small number of horses. BLM has been busy modifying the feed bunks, which is believed to have caused the hematomas. To read the veterinary report about this click here. Facility Death: 0 Cumulative Death total: 79  
Wednesday, April 14 Most stallions and weaned colts are doing well and gaining weight. Mares from Black Rock East, Black Rock West and most Granite horses continue to do well. Mares from Warm Springs and Calico are improving. Mares which have been isolated for poor condition are gaining weight as well. No miscarriages occurred. Facility Death: 0 Cumulative Death total: 79
 Tuesday, April 13 Most stallions and weaned colts are doing well and gaining weight. Mares from Black Rock East, Black Rock West and most Granite horses continue to do well. Mares from Warm Springs and Calico are improving. Mares which have been isolated for poor condition are gaining weight as well. No miscarriages occurred.  Facility Death: 0 Cumulative Death total: 79 
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13 Responses to “Broken Arrow / Calico Updates – April 13-15, 2010”

  1. sandra longley said

    curious if the hematomas are in conjuction with the pigeon fever or seperate, it should be hard to confuse the 2, one is blood filled and the other-pus???

    • sandra longley said

      I ask this because rumors are running around that they are calling the pigeon fever off in favor of hemotomas..but sounds to me like they are calling this seperate from..if i read it right?

      • sandra longley said

        Kudos to the BLM for jumping in to address the problem..Its not often we can give them a pat on the back without a knife in the vincinity…LOL

      • Yea, I was told that yesterday morning as well. I can see how this could be a possiblity as well because of the way the horses are pushing up against the fencing to get to their hay. However, while I was at the facility, I did not see any horses with hematomas (or abscesses) to their chests.
        What I did note was that the horses had rubbed their manes raw in the places where the tops of their necklines met with the suspended cable across the fencing. I inquired about this and suggested an alteration to the cable system as this could be a possible location for infection. I was told that the cable was in place to prevent the younger horses from “stepping through the opening”. This one really confused me. I know that those yearlings and weanlings are small and all, but I don’t see any of them being able to squeeze those butts through that opening of about 10-14 inches, much less their shoulders/chests.
        T.

    • Looking into that now… HSUS Vet Report from Feb 13 states the following: “We did not see any indication of infectious disease in this herd, though it was mentioned that one mare was in quarantine with what could be Strep equi (strangles) infection. (Tests came back and Strep zoo was found – no Strep equi. Pneumonia was later determined to be the problem) Apparently, though this disease has been a big problem with some holding facilities, it has not been a problem in this herd. As part of the vaccination program the horses at Indian Lakes are being immunized against Strep, using the intramuscular M protein vaccine.” Yea, it’s possible for the two to look the same when you are not able to palpate them directly. If it were an abscess and it hadn’t ruptured yet, then again, without palpation and inspection they could possibly look the same from a distance. (Note that I say could possibly, not that they do.) From a visual standpoint, both vary in sizes, vary in location, and can vary in their effects on the coat.
      T.

  2. Linda said

    Are we confused enough yet?

  3. Jan Eaker said

    From what I have been reading at other posts, the BLM is saying that there was NEVER PF at Fallon, what was THOUGHT to be PF was actually these hematomas. I take this as a BLM attempt to spin away again, because so many people have been questioning the vet report that says the horses came into the facility w/PF, as he noted old, healed abcesses, even though NO mention was made of these abcesses in either his initial report and either of the HSUS vet reports. people are not accepting this version of what is going on out there either.

  4. sandra longley said

    A couple of thoughts come to mind..It is NOT recommended that you drain a hematoma(blood blister) because the blood is a great growth medium for a bacterial infection, it is also a broken blood vessel, so opening it up,encourages that vessel to keep seeping..hematomas generally resolve themselves without intervention..also the material you would get would be serum in the hemotoma and pus in the PF-hard to confuse the two..next it would be highly unusual to get a hematoma from just pressing aginst the feed bunk to eat-it is usually caused by a blow,ie kick in that area to break blood vessals..think of your finger being hit by a hammer or pinched in something to get a blood blister, which is different than a rubbing blister..I don’t really see anything in those feeders to cause that to happen..Of course in horses not everything conforms to could have, should have..still..it leaves some question in my mind..given the fact that an outbreak of PF is considered infectious and a hemotoma isn’t..and one requires a postponement of adoptions, and one doesn’t..Not that I am suspisious or anything

    • Well of course you don’t lance or drain hematomas!
      And in this case, there wouldn’t be any lancing or draining (at least that’s what I’ve been told so far – that they’ve not lanced any abscesses) because of the nature of the horse’s pressure zones.
      Yes, you can get a hematoma from repeatedly pushing or pressing against a stationary object. However, as I said in the earlier reply, therein lies the major visible difference between the two: hematomas caused from repeated pressure against the body will typically cause raw skin as well. This would be evidenced in the horses by a rubbing off of their haircoat in the same area as the “hematoma”. I haven’t seen any bare-chested horses, so I am not inclined to think that these are hematomas. <- Like you said, a rubbing blister.
      T.

      • sandra longley said

        In their report they said those horses had been treated, by treated, what did they mean then..Hemotomas resolve themselves, not typically by bursting as pigeon fever does but just by the body absorbing the debris..The way you come to a diagnois of hemotoma is to aspirate fluid from the sac, bloody serum indicates a hemotoma, I researched for several hours looking for evidence that pressure would cause a hemotoma and did’t find anything to suggest that.

        • That was actually my exact question… I had been told that none had been lanced/drained, but then the reports say “treated”, so treated how – or with what? Haven’t gotten an answer as of yet.
          T.

  5. LOUIE COCROFT said

    EVERYTHING SHOULD BE ON HOLD RIGHT NOW–INCLUDING ADOPTIONS

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